15 Best Yellow Flowering Bushes

Yellow is a color that exudes happiness, warmth, and positivity brightening up any space. It’s no better than seeing this color surrounding our house and garden.

One of the best ways to infuse your outdoor space with yellow is by planting yellow flowering bushes. These shrubs not only add color but also offer numerous benefits such as attracting pollinators and enhancing garden health. 

Whether you’re looking to create vibrant hedges, eye-catching borders, or simply add a splash of color these plants are perfect choices.

 

Weeping Forsythia (Forsythia Suspensa)

Weeping Forsythia
Weeping Forsythia
  • Plant Size: 2-3 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Early spring
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-8

Weeping forsythia is a deciduous shrub, known for its graceful, arching branches and vibrant yellow flowers, and can grow up to 2-3 meters tall.

This plant is renowned for its cascading branches covered in brilliant yellow flowers that bloom profusely in early spring. It features lance-shaped green leaves that turn yellow or purplish in the fall. It also grows at a fast rate, thriving best in full sun to partial shade.

The flowers of the weeping forsythia are not only beautiful but also serve as an early nectar source for bees and butterflies. It pairs wonderfully with other spring bloomers like tulips and daffodils adding layers of color to your garden.

The weeping forsythia is relatively low-maintenance. Pruning after flowering helps maintain its shape and encourages vigorous growth. It’s drought-tolerant once established, although it benefits from occasional watering during dry spells.

The name “Forsythia” honors the Scottish botanist William Forsyth, and “suspensa” refers to its drooping branches. In traditional Chinese medicine, its fruit has been used for centuries for its believed health benefits.

 

Japanese Rose (Kerria Japonica)

Japanese Rose
Japanese Rose
  • Plant Size: 1-2 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Spring to early summer
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Japanese rose is a deciduous shrub, adorned with bright yellow blooms, that can grow between 1-2 meters in height. It is also called “Yamabuki” and appears in Japanese culture and poetry symbolizing simplicity and elegance.

This plant features charming, double-petaled yellow flowers that bloom from spring to early summer, and sometimes even make a second appearance in the fall. Its slender, arching branches are covered with lush green leaves, which turn a shade of yellow in autumn. 

This shrub grows at a moderate rate in partial shade to full sun. It thrives in well-drained soil and is hardy in zones 4-9. It also benefits from annual pruning after its spring bloom to maintain shape and encourage more flowers.

One of the standout features of the Japanese rose is its ability to bloom in the shade, a rarity among flowering shrubs. Moreover, it attracts bees and butterflies and pairs beautifully with other shade-loving plants like hostas and ferns creating a lush, layered look.

Besides being a pollinator magnet, the Japanese rose can serve as a low hedge or border plant, thanks to its dense growth habit. It’s also ideal for woodland gardens or as an understory shrub beneath larger trees.

 

Aaron’s Beard (Hypericum Calycinum)

Aaron's Beard
Aaron’s Beard
  • Plant Size: 0.5-1 meter in height
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Aaron’s beard is a hardy evergreen shrub and native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It boasts large, sunny yellow flowers that bloom throughout the summer. These flowers with their prominent stamens create a striking display against the dark green, oval-shaped leaves. 

One of the remarkable features of Aaron’s beard is its ability to thrive in less-than-ideal conditions, including dry or rocky soils.  It grows quickly, adapting well to full sun or partial shade, and thrives in well-drained soil. 

This plant is low-maintenance, requiring minimal care once established. Pruning in early spring can help maintain its shape and encourage more vigorous blooming. Besides, you can pair it with lavender and creeping thyme to attract bees and other pollinators supporting your garden’s ecosystem. 

Aaron’s beard is excellent for stabilizing slopes and covering large areas with its dense, mat-forming growth. It can be used as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or under trees and shrubs helping to prevent soil erosion.

 

Dyer’s Greenweed (Genista Tinctoria)

Dyer's Greenweed
Dyer’s Greenweed
  • Plant Size: 1-1.5 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Late spring to summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Dyer’s greenweed is a deciduous shrub and native to Europe and Western Asia, suitable for zones 3-7. It showcases masses of bright yellow flowers from late spring to summer. These blooms stand out against its slender, green stems and small, narrow leaves. 

This plant is quite low-maintenance. It prefers full sun and well-drained soil but can tolerate poor soil conditions. Regular pruning after flowering helps maintain its shape and encourages a bushier growth habit. It is also drought-tolerant once established making it a resilient choice for low-water gardens.

The vibrant yellow flowers are a magnet for bees and other pollinators. It pairs well with other sun-loving plants like lavender and rosemary creating a beautiful and fragrant garden bed.

Besides its beauty, dyer’s greenweed helps improve soil quality by fixing nitrogen benefiting neighboring plants. Its upright growth habit makes it suitable for borders, mixed beds, and cottage gardens.

One of the unique aspects of dyer’s greenweed is its historical use in dye production. The plant’s name reflects its traditional role in creating yellow dyes for centuries.

 

Lady Banks’ Rose (Rosa Banksiae Lutea)

Lady Banks' Rose
Lady Banks’ Rose
  • Plant Size: 2-4 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 6-9
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Lady Banks’ Rose is a vigorous, evergreen climbing shrub. It is named after Lady Dorothea Banks, the wife of the famed botanist Sir Joseph Banks. It was introduced to the West in the early 19th century and has since become a beloved garden favorite.

This plant produces clusters of small, double-petaled yellow flowers with sweet fragrance in the spring. Its rose is native to China and features thornless, arching stems and glossy, dark green leaves.

Lady Banks’ rose is relatively low-maintenance. It prefers full sun and well-drained soil but is quite drought-tolerant once established. Pruning after the bloom period helps maintain its shape and encourages more vigorous growth for the next season.

One of the standout features of Lady Banks’ rose is its thornless stems making it a gardener-friendly choice for areas where children and pets play. Additionally, its impressive blooming period in the spring is suitable for cover arbors, trellises, or fences.

The flowers of Lady Banks’ rose attract bees and butterflies. It pairs wonderfully with other climbers like clematis adding layers of color and texture to vertical garden spaces. Its dense foliage provides excellent cover and habitat for small garden creatures.

 

Oregon Grape Holly (Mahonia Aquifolium)

Oregon Grape Holly
Oregon Grape Holly
  • Plant Size: 1-2 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Oregon grape holly is a hardy evergreen shrub and native to the Pacific Northwest of the United States with a moderate growth rate. It requires minimal pruning, typically done after flowering to maintain shape. It is drought-tolerant once established but benefits from occasional watering during dry spells.

This plant produces clusters of bright yellow flowers in the spring, followed by deep blue berries that resemble grapes. The evergreen leaves are holly-like, with a glossy, leathery texture and spiny edges. In the fall, they turn a beautiful reddish-purple.

The vibrant flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. Oregon grape holly pairs well with other shade-tolerant plants like hostas and ferns, creating a lush and layered look.

This shrub is excellent for erosion control on slopes and can be used as a hedge or foundation plant. Its dense foliage provides shelter for small wildlife and contributes to a healthy garden ecosystem.

Specially, its berries are often used in jams and jellies. Its roots and bark have been used traditionally for stomach problems, tuberculosis or even dysentery. Also, the Nlaka’pamux people of British Columbia applied yellow dye to their basketry.

 

Shrubby Cinquefoil (Potentilla Fruticosa)

Shrubby Cinquefoil
Shrubby Cinquefoil
  • Plant Size: 0.5-1 meter in height
  • Bloom Time: Late spring to fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 2-7

Shrubby cinquefoil features a profusion of bright yellow flowers from late spring to fall. The small, five-petaled blooms create a stunning contrast against the fine-textured, green foliage. 

This plant is a low-growing, bushy shrub that thrives in full sun to partial shade and prefers well-drained soil. Native to the cooler regions of the Northern Hemisphere, it is exceptionally hardy, suitable for zones 2-7, and can tolerate harsh conditions, including poor soil and drought.

One of the standout features of shrubby cinquefoil is its long blooming period, providing color from late spring through fall. The vibrant flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. It pairs well with other sun-loving perennials like lavender and salvia adding layers of color to your garden.

This shrub is excellent for creating low borders, rock gardens, and mass plantings. Its dense growth habit also makes it suitable for erosion control on slopes and banks. Besides, it is incredibly low-maintenance. It requires minimal pruning, typically done in early spring to remove deadwood and maintain shape. 

 

Rock Rose (Cistus X Luteus)

Rock Rose
Rock Rose
  • Plant Size: 1-1.5 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Late spring to summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 8-10

Rock rose is an evergreen shrub and native to the Mediterranean region. This plant thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. It’s hardy in zones 8-10 and is well-suited to dry, rocky conditions.

The rock rose dazzles with bright yellow, papery flowers that bloom from late spring to summer. These blooms are set against dark green, lance-shaped leaves. They also enhance your garden’s ecological diversity by attracting bees and butterflies and pairing beautifully with other Mediterranean plants like lavender and rosemary.

Additionally, its drought tolerance makes it ideal for water-wise gardens. Its flowers, though short-lived, bloom in succession, ensuring a prolonged display of color. So, you can use it in rock gardens, as ground cover, or in borders. 

This shrub is incredibly low-maintenance. You only need to prune after flowering to maintain its shape and encourage new growth. 

Its dense growth helps prevent soil erosion making it both a practical and ornamental choice. People also use it for panic, stress, anxiety, and many other conditions.

 

Scotch Broom (Cytisus Scoparius)

Scotch Broom
Scotch Broom
  • Plant Size: 1-3 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Late spring to early summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained, sandy soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-8

Scotch broom is a deciduous shrub that has an upright, arching growth habit and thrives in full sun and well-drained, sandy soil. Native to Europe, it is hardy in zones 5-8 and is well-suited to dry, poor soil conditions.

Scotch broom showcases a profusion of bright yellow flowers from late spring to early summer. The blooms, which cover the slender, green stems, create a stunning contrast against the sparse, small leaves. 

One of the standout features of Scotch broom is its nitrogen-fixing ability, which enriches the soil and benefits surrounding plants. It is excellent for erosion control on slopes and can be used in mass plantings, borders, or as a specimen plant.

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Additionally, its bright yellow flowers are a magnet for bees and butterflies. This plant also enhances the biodiversity of your garden by pairing well with other sun-loving plants like lavender, rosemary, and ornamental grasses, creating a beautiful, drought-tolerant garden.

This shrub is incredibly low-maintenance. It thrives in poor, sandy soil and requires minimal watering once established. Pruning after flowering helps maintain its shape and encourages more blooms for the next season.

 

Spanish Broom (Spartium Junceum)

Spanish Broom
Spanish Broom
  • Plant Size: 1-3 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Late spring to summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained, sandy or rocky soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 6-10

Spanish broom is a deciduous shrub and native to the Mediterranean region. The name “Spanish broom” reflects its native region and traditional use for making brooms and weaving baskets. Its flowers were also used to produce yellow dye and essential oils.

Spanish broom produces clusters of bright yellow, pea-like flowers from late spring to summer. The blooms are not only visually stunning but also emit a sweet fragrance that can fill your garden. The shrub has slender, green, rush-like stems with small, sparse leaves. 

The vibrant flowers attract bees and butterflies. It also pairs beautifully with other Mediterranean plants like lavender, rosemary, and sage creating a harmonious and drought-tolerant garden space.

Spanish broom is excellent for stabilizing slopes and can be used in xeriscaping, rock gardens, or as a striking specimen plant. Its dense root system helps prevent soil erosion making it both a practical and ornamental choice.

This shrub is incredibly low-maintenance. It requires minimal watering once established and thrives in poor, well-drained soil. Pruning after flowering can help maintain its shape and encourage more blooms for the next season.

 

Common Gorse (Ulex Europaeus)

Common Gorse
Common Gorse
  • Plant Size: 1-2 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Primarily spring, with some flowering throughout the year
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained, sandy or rocky soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 6-9

Common gorse features vivid yellow, pea-like flowers that bloom primarily in spring but can appear sporadically throughout the year. The dense, thorny branches provide a unique texture and make it an effective barrier plant. Its small, dark green leaves are adapted to conserve water, making it drought-tolerant.

One of the remarkable features of this plant is its long flowering season providing color when many other plants have finished blooming. The dense, spiny branches also offer excellent protection and nesting sites for birds.

Moreover, the bright flowers attract bees and other pollinators enhancing your garden’s biodiversity. It pairs well with other sun-loving, drought-tolerant plants like lavender, rosemary, and heather, creating a vibrant and resilient garden space.

Common gorse is excellent for erosion control on slopes and can be used to create natural hedges or barriers. Its dense growth habit helps stabilize soil and provides habitat for wildlife.

This hardy evergreen shrub is incredibly low-maintenance. It thrives in  full sun, poor, well-drained soil and requires minimal watering once established. Pruning after flowering helps maintain its shape and prevent it from becoming too woody.

 

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum Perforatum)

St. John's Wort
St. John’s Wort
  • Plant Size: 0.5-1 meter in height
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-9

St. John’s wort is native to Europe, it is hardy in zones 5-9 and adapts well to various soil conditions. The name “St. John’s Wort” is derived from St. John the Baptist, as the plant typically blooms around his feast day in late June.

This plant features vibrant yellow, star-shaped flowers that bloom profusely in summer. The small, oval leaves have tiny translucent dots, giving them a perforated appearance when held up to the light.

St. John’s wort is outstanding with its historical use in traditional medicine, particularly for its potential mood-enhancing properties. Additionally, the plant is known for its ability to spread and create dense ground cover, slopes and embankments preventing soil erosion.

The bright flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. It can also pair well with other sun-loving perennials like lavender, echinacea, and yarrow creating a vibrant and diverse garden bed. This versatile plant is excellent for ground cover, borders, and wildflower gardens.

St. John’s Wort is low-maintenance and drought-tolerant once established. It requires minimal pruning, typically done in early spring to maintain shape and encourage new growth. Regular watering during dry spells will help the plant thrive.

 

Japanese Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii)

Japanese Barberry
Japanese Barberry
  • Plant Size: 1-1.5 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Japanese barberry gets its name derived from the Arabic word for the fruit, while “thunbergii” honors the Swedish botanist Carl Peter Thunberg, who introduced the plant to Europe. It is hardy in zones 4-8 and is adaptable to various soil conditions.

Japanese barberry features small, bright yellow flowers that bloom in spring, providing a lovely contrast to its green, red, or purple leaves. The shrub has a dense, rounded form and small, oval leaves that turn brilliant shades of red and orange in the fall. 

One of the standout features of Japanese barberry is its colorful foliage, which changes with the seasons, providing year-round interest. Additionally, the plant produces small, red berries in the fall that persist into winter, adding further visual appeal and attracting birds.

The bright flowers attract bees and other pollinators. This plant also pairs well with other sun-loving perennials like coneflowers, black-eyed Susans, and ornamental grasses creating a vibrant and dynamic garden bed.

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This shrub is excellent for borders, hedges, and foundation plantings. Its dense growth habit makes it a good choice for creating privacy screens or defining garden spaces. However, it’s important to note that in some regions, Japanese barberry can be invasive, so check local guidelines before planting.

Japanese barberry is incredibly low-maintenance. It thrives in well-drained soil and requires minimal watering once established. Pruning in late winter or early spring helps maintain its shape and encourages healthy growth.

Its berries are edible and can be used in various dishes such as jams, jellies, and sauces because they are rich in vitamin C. The plant contains the compound berberine, which is used in herbal medicine to treat digestive issues and infections.

 

Curry Plant (Helichrysum Italicum)

Curry Plant
Curry Plant
  • Plant Size: 0.5-1 meter in height
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Well-drained, sandy or rocky soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 7-10

Curry plant is an evergreen and easy-to-grow shrub. Native to the Mediterranean region, it is hardy in zones 7-10 and is well-suited to hot, dry conditions.

The curry plant boasts clusters of small, bright yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. Its narrow, silver-grey leaves emit a strong, curry-like fragrance, which adds a sensory delight to your garden. This plant has a compact, bushy form and thrives in full sun and well-drained, sandy or rocky soil. 

One of the standout features of the curry plant is its aromatic foliage, which is often used in potpourri and dried arrangements. While the leaves are not used in cooking, they can be added to dishes while cooking and removed before serving to impart a mild curry flavor.

The bright flowers attract bees and butterflies. It pairs well with other Mediterranean herbs like lavender, rosemary, and thyme, creating a harmonious and fragrant garden space.

Due to drought tolerance and preference for poor soil conditions, this plant is excellent for xeriscaping, rock gardens, and borders. It requires minimal watering once established and thrives in well-drained soil. Pruning after flowering helps maintain its shape and encourages new growth.

In traditional Mediterranean medicine, the essential oil of Helichrysum italicum is known for its antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties due to the composition of flavonoids.

 

Azalea (Rhododendron spp.)

Azalea
Azalea
  • Plant Size: 1-2 meters in height
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to full sun
  • Soil Requirement: Acidic, well-drained soil
  • Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Azalea is a delightful shrub and native to Asia, Europe, and North America. It grows at a moderate rate and thrives in partial shade to full sun. It is also hardy in zones 4-9 and adapt well to various climates and soil conditions.

Azaleas produce a profusion of bright yellow flowers in the spring, creating a breathtaking display. These deciduous or evergreen shrubs have glossy, dark green leaves that provide year-round interest.  

The vibrant blooms of Azaleas attract a variety of pollinators including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. They pair beautifully with other shade-loving plants like ferns, hostas, and hydrangeas creating a lush and layered garden bed.

Azaleas are excellent for borders, foundation plantings, and woodland gardens. Their dense growth habit helps control soil erosion and provides shelter for small wildlife.

Azaleas are relatively low-maintenance but do require some attention to soil conditions. They thrive in acidic, well-drained soil and benefit from mulching to retain moisture and maintain soil temperature. Pruning after flowering helps maintain their shape and encourages new growth.

 

FAQs

Which yellow-flowered shrub is easiest to grow?

Forsythia is one of the easiest yellow-flowered shrubs to grow. It thrives in various soil conditions, tolerates full sun to partial shade, and requires minimal maintenance. Its resilience and adaptability is perfect for gardeners of all skill levels.

 

How to care for yellow flowering shrubs in dry summer?

Water deeply once a week to encourage deep root growth. Mulch around the base to retain moisture and regulate soil temperature. Providing temporary shade during the hottest part of the day can protect young plants. Prune dead or damaged branches to reduce stress and improve air circulation.

 

Can yellow flowering shrubs survive well in cold climates?

Yes. Witch Hazel and Potentilla thrive in cold climates. Select varieties suitable for your USDA Hardiness Zone and provide winter protection, like mulching and windbreaks, to ensure their survival.

 

How to grow golden flower bushes from seeds?

Prepare the seeds (stratification may be needed), sow them in well-draining soil, and keep them moist in indirect sunlight until germination. Once seedlings are sturdy, transplant them to their permanent location and provide regular watering and sunlight.

 

What types of yellow-flowered shrubs are suitable for hedges?

Forsythia, Japanese barberry, Golden privet, Potentilla and St. John’s Wort are perfect because of their vibrant blooms, dense growth and long-lasting blooms.

 

15 Yellow Flowering Bushes
15 Yellow Flowering Bushes

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